Prince Harry and Meghan Markle are rising further apart from the royal household as a result of they ‘do issues their very own approach no matter the value, whereas the Firm refuses to bend the guidelines’, a royal professional has claimed.

Katie Nicholl famous the Duke and Duchess of Sussex’s determination to publicise a go to to Los Angeles National Cemetery on Remembrance Sunday with the assist of movie star photographer Lee Morgan after Prince Harry’s request for a wreath to be laid at the Cenotaph was snubbed.

She instructed OK! journal that the show could have solely further frayed his strained relationship with the Firm, including: ‘It highlights the nice divide between Harry and the royal household.’

‘There is such a gaping cavern now and workouts like this solely serve to widen that hole somewhat than heal the rift,’ she continued.

Prince Harry and Meghan Markle (pictured) are rising further apart from the royal household as a result of they ‘do issues their very own approach no matter the value, whereas the Firm refuses to bend the guidelines’, a royal professional has claimed

‘Harry and Meghan do issues very otherwise to the royal household and to me it exhibits how decided they are to do issues their very own approach no matter the value.’

The royal professional mentioned the couple’s determination to ‘personally recognise’ Remembrance Sunday and behaviour much like this might hurt their future roles in the monarchy. 

Katie urged it could’ve been painful for Prince Harry, 36, to have been ‘not noted’ of this 12 months’s Remembrance commemoration in London – regardless of asking for a wreath to be laid on his behalf.

The duke, who spent 10 years serving the army, is believed to have been ‘deeply saddened’ after palace aides refused to grant his request, based on The Times.

But Katie insisted that the royal household are not ready to bend the guidelines.

Katie Nicholl noted the Duke and Duchess of Sussex's decision to publicise a visit to Los Angeles National Cemetery on Remembrance Sunday with the help of celebrity photographer Lee Morgan after Prince Harry's request for a wreath to be laid at the Cenotaph was snubbed. Pictured, The Queen on Remembrance Sunday

Katie Nicholl famous the Duke and Duchess of Sussex’s determination to publicise a go to to Los Angeles National Cemetery on Remembrance Sunday with the assist of movie star photographer Lee Morgan after Prince Harry’s request for a wreath to be laid at the Cenotaph was snubbed. Pictured, The Queen on Remembrance Sunday

It later emerged that Prince Harry’s wreath was made at the Royal British Legion’s Kent HQ for £1,000, however lay there forgotten.

Prince Harry and Meghan, 39, stepped again from their royal duties in March – however the royal professional mentioned Buckingham Palace could have been watching their behaviour.

She mentioned the Sussexes could have been monitored ‘very intently’ throughout this trial 12 months and probation interval.

Prince Harry and Meghan ‘personally recognised’ Remembrance Day by visiting the Los Angeles National Cemetery to pay their respects to fallen Commonwealth troopers.

Meghan and Prince Harry visit the Los Angeles National Cemetery in honour of Remembrance Sunday

Meghan and Prince Harry go to the Los Angeles National Cemetery in honour of Remembrance Sunday

Prince Harry signed a message with the wreath he left at the cemetery saying: 'To all of those who have served, and are serving. Thank you'

Prince Harry signed a message with the wreath he left at the cemetery saying: ‘To all of those that have served, and are serving. Thank you’

They also placed a wreath at an obelisk in the cemetery that features a plaque that's inscribed 'In Memory of the Men Who Offered Their Lives in Defence of Their Country'

They additionally positioned a wreath at an obelisk in the cemetery that contains a plaque that is inscribed ‘In Memory of the Men Who Offered Their Lives in Deference of Their Country’

The Duke and Duchess of Sussex laid flowers that they had picked from their very own backyard at two graves, one for many who had served in the Royal Australian Air Force and one for troopers from the Royal Canadian Artillery. 

They additionally positioned a wreath at an obelisk in the cemetery that contains a plaque inscribed ‘In Memory of the Men Who Offered Their Lives In Defence Of Their Country’. 

The couple laid flowers in reminiscence of the Ronald William Scott, a Leading Aircraftman in the Royal Australian Air Force who died in the Second World War, aged simply 22. 

They additionally visited the grave of Captain William Quayle Setliffe Sr, who served in the First World War, earlier than dying on Christmas Day in 1946 at the age of 61. He served with the Royal Canadian Artillery. 

Prince William and Prince Charles attend the Remembrance Sunday ceremony at the Cenotaph on Whitehall in London

Prince William and Prince Charles attend the Remembrance Sunday ceremony at the Cenotaph on Whitehall in London

Members of the public were told not to go to the memorial for the wreath laying because of strict lockdown restrictions

Members of the public have been instructed to not go to the memorial for the wreath laying due to strict lockdown restrictions

Harry was pictured carrying a navy swimsuit along with his service medals hooked up, whereas Meghan wore an extended belted black coat. The pair wore masks on the technique to the cemetery, although they have been pictured with out them once they reached the graves.

The flowers have been picked by Meghan from the backyard of their $14 million Santa Barbara mansion.  

A spokesman for the couple mentioned: ‘It was necessary to the duke and duchess to have the ability to personally recognise Remembrance in their very own approach, to pay tribute to those that have served and to those that gave their lives.

‘The couple laid flowers that the duchess picked from their backyard at the gravesites of two commonwealth troopers, one who had served in the Royal Australian Air Force and one from the Royal Canadian Artillery.’

The assertion mentioned in addition they positioned a wreath at an obelisk in the cemetery. ‘The duke signed a message with the wreath saying: “To all of those who have served, and are serving. Thank you”.’